Diagnostic Reagents

Top Page > Diagnostic Reagents > Atlas of Antinuclear Antibodies > Mixed patterns

Fluorescence patterns of autoantibodies

Mixed patterns


Mixed staining patterns are observed in a patient's serum containing more than one autoantibody. Since it is sometimes difficult to distinguish different autoantibodies, the patterns can often be confirmed by titrating out the serum for its quantitative evaluation. It is also useful to observe the staining of the chromosomal region and surrounding cytoplasm in mitotic cells. The following photos show examples of mixed patterns.


indicate staining of the homogeneous, speckled and the mixed patterns respectively


photo 7
Speckled nuclear staining


photo 8
Homogeneous nuclear staining


photo 9
Speckled nuclear staining and Homogeneous nuclear staining mixed

The serum sample with the speckled pattern (photo 7) was mixed with another serum with homogeneous pattern (photo 8) at 1:1 ratio. The mixed sample shows the speckled pattern in interphase cells combined with chromosomal staining of mitotic cells. (photo 9) The staining pattern is suggestive of coexistence of the speckled and the homogeneous patterns.




show another example of the mixed pattern


photo 10
Anti-centromere antibody


photo 11
Anti-mitochondrial antibody


photo 12
The characteristic staining of nucleus and cytoplasm suggestive of the coexistence of both antibodies

A serum sample with the anti-centromere antibody (photo 10) and the anti-mitochondrial antibody (photo 11) gives characteristic staining of nucleus and cytoplasm suggestive of the coexistence of both antibodies (photo 12).



↑ TOP


>> NEXT "Fluorescence patterns of nuclear autoantigens"


Full Site